Water Innovation conversation

This website will be taken down from 6th March onwards. A big thank you to all our participants. If you want to get in touch, please email us at: your.say@water.wa.gov.au

The Water Innovation team

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Welcome to the conversation

Water is essential for enabling our communities to flourish, our economy to grow and for sustaining our precious waterways and wetlands. The Department of Water is looking to build on successes in water management and innovation to date. We believe that there are further gains to be made and opportunities to be explored.

We recognise the contribution the community and private sector can make to developing innovative and creative water solutions, that provide practical and cost effective answers to the water challenges we face. If you are interested in being part of the discussion and would like to share your ideas, we invite you to register at 'Your say WA Water'.


This website will be taken down from 6th March onwards. A big thank you to all our participants. If you want to get in touch, please email us at: your.say@water.wa.gov.au

The Water Innovation team

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welcome to the conversation

Water is essential for enabling our communities to flourish, our economy to grow and for sustaining our precious waterways and wetlands. The Department of Water is looking to build on successes in water management and innovation to date. We believe that there are further gains to be made and opportunities to be explored.

We recognise the contribution the community and private sector can make to developing innovative and creative water solutions, that provide practical and cost effective answers to the water challenges we face. If you are interested in being part of the discussion and would like to share your ideas, we invite you to register at 'Your say WA Water'.


Discussions: All (6) Open (0)
  • CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Domestic garden bores add to the water supply for many households in the Perth metropolitan area. They tap into shallow local groundwater, a resource that is also used for watering crops, schools, parks and playing fields, drinking water, and is important for the environment and liveability.

    To encourage households with a domestic garden bore to be waterwise, the Department of Water manages water use through restrictions and a winter sprinkler ban, and advises where water quality is unsuitable for domestic garden bores. Looking ahead, as we experience the effects of a drying climate, there will be... Continue reading

    Domestic garden bores add to the water supply for many households in the Perth metropolitan area. They tap into shallow local groundwater, a resource that is also used for watering crops, schools, parks and playing fields, drinking water, and is important for the environment and liveability.

    To encourage households with a domestic garden bore to be waterwise, the Department of Water manages water use through restrictions and a winter sprinkler ban, and advises where water quality is unsuitable for domestic garden bores. Looking ahead, as we experience the effects of a drying climate, there will be less groundwater available to share. It is time to think about how we use domestic garden bores so our groundwater remains sustainable. What are your ideas for that?


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    Water is critical to the health and liveability of our communities, our state's economy and the environment. The average per person water use has decreased over recent years but Perth still remains one of the highest water using cities in Australia.

    How can we make Perth and other parts of Western Australia more resilient to the changing climate and ensure our communities remain liveable, sustainable and prosperous places to live.



    Water is critical to the health and liveability of our communities, our state's economy and the environment. The average per person water use has decreased over recent years but Perth still remains one of the highest water using cities in Australia.

    How can we make Perth and other parts of Western Australia more resilient to the changing climate and ensure our communities remain liveable, sustainable and prosperous places to live.



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    Management of drainage assets and corridors for multiple objectives provides many health and recreational benefits to the community. Benefits include improved amenity, aesthetics and safety; cooling of the urban environment; increased access to biodiversity and provision of habitat; and improved water quality outcomes.

    We would like to get your thoughts on how to get better results from drainage assets and corridors to benefit communities and the environment.

    Management of drainage assets and corridors for multiple objectives provides many health and recreational benefits to the community. Benefits include improved amenity, aesthetics and safety; cooling of the urban environment; increased access to biodiversity and provision of habitat; and improved water quality outcomes.

    We would like to get your thoughts on how to get better results from drainage assets and corridors to benefit communities and the environment.

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    We are working to become more climate resilient by reducing water use, increasing water recycling and developing new water sources.

    One of the key alternative sources is recycled water from wastewater, which is treated to be ‘fit for purpose’ for its intended use, such irrigation of public open space or horticultural use.

    We are interested to hear your ideas on how we can increase the use of recycled water, particularly through creating markets for the use of recycled water.

    We are working to become more climate resilient by reducing water use, increasing water recycling and developing new water sources.

    One of the key alternative sources is recycled water from wastewater, which is treated to be ‘fit for purpose’ for its intended use, such irrigation of public open space or horticultural use.

    We are interested to hear your ideas on how we can increase the use of recycled water, particularly through creating markets for the use of recycled water.
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    We would like to hear your ideas on how we can increase water security in regional towns. This means having enough water for drinking and non-drinking uses such as watering of playing fields, firefighting and for emergency use by farm livestock when on-farm supplies fail.

    How can we manage water resources sustainably, optimise available water and identify new water supply options in order for communities and regional towns to meet their water needs? Are there new ways of using alternative water sources, such as wastewater and stormwater, that we could consider?

    The Department of Water developed a... Continue reading

    We would like to hear your ideas on how we can increase water security in regional towns. This means having enough water for drinking and non-drinking uses such as watering of playing fields, firefighting and for emergency use by farm livestock when on-farm supplies fail.

    How can we manage water resources sustainably, optimise available water and identify new water supply options in order for communities and regional towns to meet their water needs? Are there new ways of using alternative water sources, such as wastewater and stormwater, that we could consider?

    The Department of Water developed a rural water program to improve water supplies for broadacre agricultural and community use, and to ensure the best use of water resources in dryland agricultural regions.

    The Water Corporation also has a regional water supply program.

    Some links related to sustainable development in regional Western Australia:

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    We invite you to share your thoughts of how we can best manage and make use of water in Western Australia.

    What changes do we need to make to improve the way we manage and make use of water in urban communities?

    • How can we work better in partnership to develop innovative water solutions?

    • Can you think of new ways of doing business that can foster innovative solutions to water problems?

    • What do you see as being barriers and challenges to innovation in the water sector?

    Elements to consider when planning for sustainable water,... Continue reading

    We invite you to share your thoughts of how we can best manage and make use of water in Western Australia.

    What changes do we need to make to improve the way we manage and make use of water in urban communities?

    • How can we work better in partnership to develop innovative water solutions?

    • Can you think of new ways of doing business that can foster innovative solutions to water problems?

    • What do you see as being barriers and challenges to innovation in the water sector?

    Elements to consider when planning for sustainable water, land and infrastructure developments include the environment, wellbeing of the community, economics and design.

    The Department of Water has been involved in developing a vision for Perth as a water sensitive city, with the CRC for Water Sensitive Cities.

    Some examples of sustainable urban development in Western Australia are:


    In order to be part of the conversation, please register here.

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