Water Innovation conversation

Welcome to the conversation

Water is essential for enabling our communities to flourish, our economy to grow and for sustaining our precious waterways and wetlands. The Department of Water is looking to build on successes in water management and innovation to date. We believe that there are further gains to be made and opportunities to be explored.

We recognise the contribution the community and private sector can make to developing innovative and creative water solutions, that provide practical and cost effective answers to the water challenges we face. If you are interested in being part of the discussion and would like to share your ideas, we invite you to register at 'Your say WA Water'.


Welcome to the conversation

Water is essential for enabling our communities to flourish, our economy to grow and for sustaining our precious waterways and wetlands. The Department of Water is looking to build on successes in water management and innovation to date. We believe that there are further gains to be made and opportunities to be explored.

We recognise the contribution the community and private sector can make to developing innovative and creative water solutions, that provide practical and cost effective answers to the water challenges we face. If you are interested in being part of the discussion and would like to share your ideas, we invite you to register at 'Your say WA Water'.


Discussions: All (6) Open (1)
  • Domestic garden bores add to the water supply for many households in the Perth metropolitan area. They tap into shallow local groundwater, a resource that is also used for watering crops, schools, parks and playing fields, drinking water, and is important for the environment and liveability.

    To encourage households with a domestic garden bore to be waterwise, the Department of Water manages water use through restrictions and a winter sprinkler ban, and advises where water quality is unsuitable for domestic garden bores. Looking ahead, as we experience the effects of a drying climate, there will be... Continue reading

    Domestic garden bores add to the water supply for many households in the Perth metropolitan area. They tap into shallow local groundwater, a resource that is also used for watering crops, schools, parks and playing fields, drinking water, and is important for the environment and liveability.

    To encourage households with a domestic garden bore to be waterwise, the Department of Water manages water use through restrictions and a winter sprinkler ban, and advises where water quality is unsuitable for domestic garden bores. Looking ahead, as we experience the effects of a drying climate, there will be less groundwater available to share. It is time to think about how we use domestic garden bores so our groundwater remains sustainable. What are your ideas for that?


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